Makeover experience on Cityline

I’m sure most of you, like myself, have always envisioned having a makeover. It looks fun and you know that if it’s on TV….it’s bound to be good.
So I jumped on the first chance I got, the annual Allied Beauty Association’s Ordinary to Extraordinary competition that would be aired on Cityline. A casting call for ladies looking for a new cut and style was put out through social media and I applied and waited to hear back.

Hear back I did! Our stylist would be judged on their ability to work on ‘everyday people’ (versus models). Al-right…I was totally up for it. I mean hair grows back so even if it is a crazy doo it’s okay. Besides I needed a bit of a hair shakeup. We were allowed to bring a guest (babies were also welcomed) and were given the chance to explore the industry only beauty event prior to our casting call. Once assembled we were seated and the hairstylists (who each had a number they picked) were allowed to pick their models. It did feel very much like the high school gym scenes depicted in the movies. Most stylists were trying to find the hair that they could work with best and I was picked nine out of the twenty. Phew!

At this point I had an individual consultation with my hairstylist and make up artist. The stylist was a very eager but nervous beaver. She decided she first had to mess me up a bit and so off came my make up (we were told to wear minimal make up and come with clean hair) and she parted my hair in the most unflattering manner. She then tried to adorn me with feather jewelry and I had to put a stop to that….I was wearing a professional looking dress and this girl hates birds and will have nothing to do with feathers!! Don’t get me wrong, the stylist was very nice and had a super upbeat energy to her, she was driven but it all seemed a bit too over the top for my taste. My make up artist on the other hand was absolutely fabulous and had a well balanced attitude.

Unflattering no smiling before shot (ignore shingle scars!)

 

The before shots were taken. We know the drill…every subject is made to look horribly desperate. Fine. Go ahead. Take my ugly picture. Next up we had to meet with the two judges. This is where the stylist divulges her plans and sells her personality. My stylist had been on this path before and she did her best to promote herself…perhaps even a bit too strongly. The judges informed her that she shouldn’t go too short with me but did say that a crop would be good.

After chilling for about half an hour we reported for the competition. All twenty stylists, their make up artists and ‘model’ were seated and the show began! Tunes cranked, camera men twirling around, the energy was high with the room filled with beauty industry professionals and family and friends of the participants. In thirty minutes the models were to have a cut, style and make up application.

 

 

 

After shot

When I first saw myself in the mirror I didn’t realize how short my hair was. It felt light and breezy and I thought I might like it. I was doing my best to be a team player. I laughed, hummed along with the tunes and wore a smile on my face during the competition. After all, I knew that the judges were watching  and I was going to do my best to help my stylist win the $1000 cheque and the opportunity to be a stylist on CityLine. I knew this was important to her. I even strutted on stage, sashayed and winked at the judges...all for a stranger I’d just met.  Unfortunately she did not win. The judges stressed over and over again – that they were being judged on their ability to work on real people. Making drastic changes (which a lot of stylists did) wasn’t what they were looking for. They wanted to see a great style which would make the model feel fabulous and extra ordinary. I think the winning duo definitely did this for their model. I wasn’t pleased with my cut and infact  decided to wait two weeks to get used to the new do before I  penned my thoughts. Well two weeks later I’m still not loving it, but it is growing on me (hah!) and I am learning to manage it. My only request was that while the stylist could do anything she wanted with my hair, I wanted it to be wash and go as I’m not one for styling it. Well short hair is  definitely not wash and go.  I know it seems like it would be, but it isn’t.  Atleast not for me. I need to blow dry and curl it or else I  look like  I just got out of a major catfight. Not cool.

 

Flagged by my makeup artist and hairstylist

 

As soon as I meet with a stylist I tell them that they can do whatever they want. Major fail. I really should be more specific. It has taken this long for me to realize this. As a result it has been ages since I walked out of a haircut feeling really good about it and myself. In fact the last time was back in 2004 when a friend who was a Tony&Guy trained professional styled my hair. Oh how I loved that. Wish I was still in Karachi to convince her to style my hair once again. I’ve tried many Tony&Guy  joints in the hopes of having that cut replicated but to no luck and so my search continues. I’ll just have to wait till the hair grows back!

 

 

 

 

Here’s some tips if you’re ever on a makeover show where you have the  ability to be assertive ( I  did and I wasn’t)

  1. Be specific about what you want done
  2. Trust your stylist, they are the professionals BUT voice your concerns
  3. Have fun and help your stylist. Your attitude is important and the judges will feed off your energy.

 

Update : It’s been a month and I’m loving the new cut. I’ve learned how to play with  my hair and it’s quite versatile. It isn’t wash and go  but with ten minutes of TLC it’s photoshoot ready!

UBU team working their magic

Before and After

Strutting my stuff on stage